Weather / Storm Watch thread ..

danger here

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Maybe, I am just reading the subtiles where it says 120 litres are forecast to falle on Thursday.
Re: Rainfall

The liters of rainfall measurement is actually liters/square meter (L/m2).

In traditional terms,
1 L/m2 = 1 mm


The Germans definitely measure in litres, though Hollandia would know best, I make it close to 47 5 odd inches (Hollandia is correct)! While it seems absurdly high, it would tally with what has happened. 3 bridges along our major local river have washed away completely.

The Moselle river near Trier is currently 9 meters above it's regular height, 2 hospitals have been evacuated, as well as 2000 residents nearby.
 

danger here

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The death toll here will be rising further I fear, there are shedloads of missing people posts on facebook tonight
 

Robutnua

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Watching news on Germany and Europe re this flooding event.

On CNN they said in Germany places had twice the amount of monthly rainfall in ONE NIGHT.

JOKES ASIDE .. imagine if/when something like that hits Cork City, it would destroy the city, particularly the low lying marsh area in the center.
 

midlander12

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The death toll here will be rising further I fear, there are shedloads of missing people posts on facebook tonight
BBC is saying 1300 missing. This is looking like Europe's biggest flood disaster sine 1953, when thousands died in the Netherlands and East Anglia (I think before the major dyke-building in the former).

Meanwhile, climate change scientists are basically saying we're fucked -

They've correctly warned over decades that a fast-warming climate would bring worse bursts of rain and more damaging heatwaves.
But they say their computers are not powerful enough to accurately project the severity of those extremes.


If we ever get past this Covid madness, we might hopefully get a year or two before we get roasted to death or swept away by the final Great Deluge.

 

danger here

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Pleased to say, after a 36 hour communications blackout in our future home 700 km away, the in-laws checked on our house Friday morning. It turns out the neighbours had blocked off our doors. We barely got 2 pint glasses of water inside, I've split more in a Dublin pub. Bit of mud to clean up out of the garage and garden but that's about it. A neighbour of us had not heard the news since Wednesday, and was shocked to hear the scale of things, she called my wife from her work about 15 miles away as it was the only place with fecking phone signal.
 

Derryman

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Pleased to say, after a 36 hour communications blackout in our future home 700 km away, the in-laws checked on our house Friday morning. It turns out the neighbours had blocked off our doors. We barely got 2 pint glasses of water inside, I've split more in a Dublin pub. Bit of mud to clean up out of the garage and garden but that's about it. A neighbour of us had not heard the news since Wednesday, and was shocked to hear the scale of things, she called my wife from her work about 15 miles away as it was the only place with fecking phone signal.
That is wonderful.
Delighted for you.
 

snorlax

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Watching the scenes from Germany is surreal. It reminds me of what you'd expect to see during the rainy season in monsoon countries in SE Asia. Is Europe turning towards a monsoon climate?
 

hollandia

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Watching the scenes from Germany is surreal. It reminds me of what you'd expect to see during the rainy season in monsoon countries in SE Asia. Is Europe turning towards a monsoon climate?
In the short to mid term, no. We are experiencing more extreme weather events however, and in the case of rain, urban development is contributing to the sort of flash flooding we see in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands.

At that level of rainfall, there will be floods regardless, but it is exacerbated in terms of speed and severity by the increase in impermeable area. Sustainable urban drainage design can help mitigate, but is well nigh impossible to retrofit.

Also, given that meteorologists believe that they're lagging behind in terms of computing and modelling power, there's a worry that current drainage designs may be undersized for the events that are coming our way.

Noticeably, (and a branch of our company is involved in flood protection and mitigation), there's a huge nimby barrier to be overcome in Ireland in respect of flood defences in some of our cities and towns.

Some people just can't see the bigger picture.
 

Cruimh

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In the short to mid term, no. We are experiencing more extreme weather events however, and in the case of rain, urban development is contributing to the sort of flash flooding we see in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands.

At that level of rainfall, there will be floods regardless, but it is exacerbated in terms of speed and severity by the increase in impermeable area. Sustainable urban drainage design can help mitigate, but is well nigh impossible to retrofit.

Also, given that meteorologists believe that they're lagging behind in terms of computing and modelling power, there's a worry that current drainage designs may be undersized for the events that are coming our way.

Noticeably, (and a branch of our company is involved in flood protection and mitigation), there's a huge nimby barrier to be overcome in Ireland in respect of flood defences in some of our cities and towns.

Some people just can't see the bigger picture.
The expansion of the suburbs and the loss of land to drain away water is our own fault.
 
Apr 24, 2020
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In the short to mid term, no. We are experiencing more extreme weather events however, and in the case of rain, urban development is contributing to the sort of flash flooding we see in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands.

At that level of rainfall, there will be floods regardless, but it is exacerbated in terms of speed and severity by the increase in impermeable area. Sustainable urban drainage design can help mitigate, but is well nigh impossible to retrofit.

Also, given that meteorologists believe that they're lagging behind in terms of computing and modelling power, there's a worry that current drainage designs may be undersized for the events that are coming our way.

Noticeably, (and a branch of our company is involved in flood protection and mitigation), there's a huge nimby barrier to be overcome in Ireland in respect of flood defences in some of our cities and towns.

Some people just can't see the bigger picture.
Our family home had repeated flooding issues as a kid. Never damaged the house, but the cars were occasionally soggy, and 6 to 12 inches of water front and back was common. We laid extensive French drains in the back and beefed up the driveway drainage. That had little overall effect.

What did have an effect was time. Its like the water table has dropped in the area. This is close to the dodder River. And that area, in particular, downstream,, has not been catastrophically flooded in decades.

So not sure if there has been works downstream, or if the dodder has been improved.

My point is that improved drainage is a huge win for homes. Never understood objecting to having your or someone else's home not wiped out.
 

hollandia

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The expansion of the suburbs and the loss of land to drain away water is our own fault.
Yes, though newish suburbs (post 1990s) should have SUDS systems incorporated including attenuation. But the real issue is the failure to mitigate climate change in any meaningful way. I fear we may already be past the event horizon.
 

hollandia

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Our family home had repeated flooding issues as a kid. Never damaged the house, but the cars were occasionally soggy, and 6 to 12 inches of water front and back was common. We laid extensive French drains in the back and beefed up the driveway drainage. That had little overall effect.

What did have an effect was time. Its like the water table has dropped in the area. This is close to the dodder River. And that area, in particular, downstream,, has not been catastrophically flooded in decades.

So not sure if there has been works downstream, or if the dodder has been improved.

My point is that improved drainage is a huge win for homes. Never understood objecting to having your or someone else's home not wiped out.
I'm pretty sure both improvements upstream and downstream have occurred. I remember a few years ago looking at flood reports for the Camac in Dublin and there was a history of flooding going back to the sixties, and subsequent. There have been significant changes since.

The reason it sticks in my mind was because of the florid language used in the report by the engineer back in the sixties:

"Like ancient Gaul, this report has four parts..."

(I'd get summarily fired for even attempting something like that)
 
Apr 24, 2020
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I'm pretty sure both improvements upstream and downstream have occurred. I remember a few years ago looking at flood reports for the Camac in Dublin and there was a history of flooding going back to the sixties, and subsequent. There have been significant changes since.

The reason it sticks in my mind was because of the florid language used in the report by the engineer back in the sixties:

"Like ancient Gaul, this report has four parts..."

(I'd get summarily fired for even attempting something like that)
Subdivisions of Gaul? Surely that was an Asterisk reference...
 

danger here

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That's what I thought as I was a huge fan as a kid, but seemingly it was true.

Aremorica has a whiff of south cantae Dublin off it..
 

danger here

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That is wonderful.
Delighted for you.

Thanks DM, we're coming back to normality mentally now, we hadn't ate or slept for 2 nights. We only got the keys three weeks ago and moving over fully in a couple months so the whole thing is still hard to process. I've hard far tougher things happen in life, but this really kicked me in the gut. Had to leave work on Thursday as it was too much not knowing one way or the other what had happened to our soon to be home. The numerous glasses of whiskey on Wednesday night didn't help probably. Relieved for ourselves of course, but as my wife said, that whole region is going to be traumatized for years to come by this.
 

Truthisfree

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Thanks DM, we're coming back to normality mentally now, we hadn't ate or slept for 2 nights. We only got the keys three weeks ago and moving over fully in a couple months so the whole thing is still hard to process. I've hard far tougher things happen in life, but this really kicked me in the gut. Had to leave work on Thursday as it was too much not knowing one way or the other what had happened to our soon to be home. The numerous glasses of whiskey on Wednesday night didn't help probably. Relieved for ourselves of course, but as my wife said, that whole region is going to be traumatized for years to come by this.
You’ve got some good neighbours there too looking out for you.
 

Robutnua

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Watching news on Germany and Europe re this flooding event. On CNN they said in Germany places had twice the amount of monthly rainfall in ONE NIGHT.

JOKES ASIDE .. imagine if/when something like that hits Cork City
, it would destroy the city, particularly the low lying marsh area in the center.
And then DUBLIN .. potentially by 2050:

 
Apr 24, 2020
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As a slight aside, the impact of trees on cooling the immediate area is felt in its absence. Not just shade, but transpiration and associated evaporation cools the immediate area, and can make a massive difference.

We had 28 c in the car today, parked in the drive, normally never that high, but we have less tree coverage than previous years .
 

midlander12

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Thanks DM, we're coming back to normality mentally now, we hadn't ate or slept for 2 nights. We only got the keys three weeks ago and moving over fully in a couple months so the whole thing is still hard to process. I've hard far tougher things happen in life, but this really kicked me in the gut. Had to leave work on Thursday as it was too much not knowing one way or the other what had happened to our soon to be home. The numerous glasses of whiskey on Wednesday night didn't help probably. Relieved for ourselves of course, but as my wife said, that whole region is going to be traumatized for years to come by this.
I know the feeling, a bit anyway. My house was flooded in our own floods back in Nov 09 (not a comparable event overall, I hasten to add). Fortunately we got home in time to mitigate the worst of the damage and divert the water from the parts of the ground floor it had not yet got too. Still a horrible experience and a feeling of powerlessness that stays in your memory.
 

midlander12

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I'm pretty sure both improvements upstream and downstream have occurred. I remember a few years ago looking at flood reports for the Camac in Dublin and there was a history of flooding going back to the sixties, and subsequent. There have been significant changes since.

The reason it sticks in my mind was because of the florid language used in the report by the engineer back in the sixties:

"Like ancient Gaul, this report has four parts..."

(I'd get summarily fired for even attempting something like that)
Oh dear, the poor man clearly had Caesar Gallic Wars drilled into him during Latin class. It was still going on well after the 60's, I might add.
 
Nov 29, 2018
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As a slight aside, the impact of trees on cooling the immediate area is felt in its absence. Not just shade, but transpiration and associated evaporation cools the immediate area, and can make a massive difference.

We had 28 c in the car today, parked in the drive, normally never that high, but we have less tree coverage than previous years .
And more to be removed for the latest bus/cycle lanes brainstorm, some over 250 years old.
 

danger here

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You’ve got some good neighbours there too looking out for you.
Thanks, the thing is they did us a few other good turns recently, it's embarrassing after this. We'll return the favour I'm sure once we're there. Will be joining the local volunteer fire brigade after this anyway.
 

Robutnua

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Usually every year we used go to likes of malta, italy, spain, portugal or croatia for 2 x 1 week holidays evey year .. say 1 week in june another aug/sept. Dinkys us .. Double income, no kids :D

Last time we went was sept 2019. Then lockdowns and pretty much here in our house since.

Last few days I notice I cannot take this mid 20s+ heat here so much. However back in the 2 weeks a year as i described abroad, i had no prob with even higher temps there. Loved being out in it ( appropriate factor and hats etc )

So it got me wondering, have we got out of the acclimatisation provided by those regular 2 weeks away. Does your body get out of the habit?

Or is it the type of heat here at these temps, the high humidity etc?
 
Nov 29, 2018
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Usually every year we used go to likes of malta, italy, spain, portugal or croatia for 2 x 1 week holidays evey year .. say 1 week in june another aug/sept. Dinkys us .. Double income, no kids :D

Last time we went was sept 2019. Then lockdowns and pretty much here in our house since.

Last few days I notice I cannot take this mid 20s+ heat here so much. However back in the 2 weeks a year as i described abroad, i had no prob with even higher temps there. Loved being out in it ( appropriate factor and hats etc )

So it got me wondering, have we got out of the acclimatisation provided by those regular 2 weeks away. Does your body get out of the habit?

Or is it the type of heat here at these temps, the high humidity etc?
Works both ways, took me years to get used to the Irish climate after 22 years in the middle east. I moved to France in 2019 and immediately adapted to higher temperatures. This last winter has been one of the longest and coldest in over twenty years. Spring and Summer came late with lower temperature than normal. We finally started to get high 20s into the 30s, on the days when the temperature drops to mid 20s and below I find myself reaching for heavy jumpers and jeans.
 

Cruimh

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Despite what Siri claims about temperatures in the low 60s here, it feels bloody hot and the tarmac on the road surface is glistening.

Discussed with sister who sa "It's a plot, all over 60s will be getting 'rigged' weather information to kill us since covid hasn't wiped us out yet."
 

Franzoni

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And then DUBLIN .. potentially by 2050:


I've seen that projection before......

During the lockdown when i was out walking i noticed a huge new house being built in Clontarf very close to the seafront and the thought crossed my mind it could well end up under the sea in my lifetime.....

I also remember huge amounts of the residents down there protesting against flood defences being built not so long ago.......
 

Shaadi

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Feb 16, 2019
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Here in the Midlands it was hitting 30-31° for much of yesterday afternoon and early evening. I thought 22° at 9.30 yesterday morning was an impressive warning sign. Took a drive last night at midnight and it was 20-21° everywhere I went . Today it was already 29-30° in the sitting room by 10.30 am.
 

Truthisfree

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Here in the Midlands it was hitting 30-31° for much of yesterday afternoon and early evening. I thought 22° at 9.30 yesterday morning was an impressive warning sign. Took a drive last night at midnight and it was 20-21° everywhere I went . Today it was already 29-30° in the sitting room by 10.30 am.
Jaysus…that’s hot inside, I’m in my kitchen which gets the most sun and it’s 20° while it’s 26° outside. I have ivy across the front of my house and it makes a huge difference to the temperature conducted from outside.
 

Shaadi

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Jaysus…that’s hot inside, I’m in my kitchen which gets the most sun and it’s 20° while it’s 26° outside. I have ivy across the front of my house and it makes a huge difference to the temperature conducted from outside.
Good stuff with the ivy. In winter it probably keeps a bit of the chill at bay as well.
 

Gatsbygirl20

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Jaysus…that’s hot inside, I’m in my kitchen which gets the most sun and it’s 20° while it’s 26° outside. I have ivy across the front of my house and it makes a huge difference to the temperature conducted from outside.
I am in the West today, and it is a blessed 18 degrees with a slight breeze...Heaven, after yesterday's sweltering temps in Dublin...
 
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