Transition Year

I didn't do transition year myself, but I very much agree with the idea of trying to improve creativity, life skills and having a more holistic approach in education. But might transition year be better served in a year between leaving cert and university instead of between the junior cert and leaving cert? There might be more of a personal change before university instead of at 15. Also, they may have an increased work ethic at that age to ensure they make the most of transition year.
 

Cruimh

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Must admit - when I went to Scotland (Edinburgh) in the 1970s the Scottish students who just used their highers had a significantly higher drop out rate over those who had stayed on to do A levels. That year made a heck of a difference. But the drop-out rates in Glasgow were lower than in Edinburgh - because there were considerably more of the students who lived at home.
 

danger here

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I didn't do it either but I have a feeling you're on to something. In my life experience, I would never have studied the subjects I did when I look back 20 years. I mainly did the subjects I did due to parental choice rather than my own as such. I used to be reading the history book cover to cover when I was meant to be doing maths, didn't even do history for the LC.

I'm not saying an extra year at the end would have given me the benefit of hindsight but there's far too much pressure with the LC, CAO ect. Our society would be far better served with happy kids, each to their ability ect, than drones being educated to work in industry X and Y. Also, the dual apprentice system that Germany and other countries use would be beneficial to Ireland. Whereas from what I remember, an apprentice was considered not much more than someone who left school early. In DIT where I was the apprentices were basically hidden away from the rest of the students in a grubby old building with caged windows, we used to have a few tutorials in their building so I saw the state of it.
 

hollandia

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I didn't do it either but I have a feeling you're on to something. In my life experience, I would never have studied the subjects I did when I look back 20 years. I mainly did the subjects I did due to parental choice rather than my own as such. I used to be reading the history book cover to cover when I was meant to be doing maths, didn't even do history for the LC.

I'm not saying an extra year at the end would have given me the benefit of hindsight but there's far too much pressure with the LC, CAO ect. Our society would be far better served with happy kids, each to their ability ect, than drones being educated to work in industry X and Y. Also, the dual apprentice system that Germany and other countries use would be beneficial to Ireland. Whereas from what I remember, an apprentice was considered not much more than someone who left school early. In DIT where I was the apprentices were basically hidden away from the rest of the students in a grubby old building with caged windows, we used to have a few tutorials in their building so I saw the state of it.
Do away with TY altogether. it fails in it's purpose because there are essentially 15 months where the academic cycle is disrupted. Do LC over three years with specific two week windows in which to do the TY stuff.
 
I think project work and self-education is good for creativity and enthusiasm. Teachers are always of course a great help. But studying by yourself and homework can give you extra time to come up with your own ideas and interpretations. Learning a foreign language at school for example is a great motivator. Although after you’ve finished secondary school, I imagine it’s still good to keep it up as a hobby in your spare time. I’m afraid I’ve very much fallen behind in that regard and have forgotten much of my French! I think elements of self-education in transition year could assist with that growth mindset. I’m sure there’s plenty of affordable distance learning courses, though I think options like the open university could be looked into further in terms of government 3rd level funding. Part-time projects with the leaving cert geography or history are great for encouraging fondness for the subject and student initiative.
 

Cookiemonster

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I didn't do it either but I have a feeling you're on to something. In my life experience, I would never have studied the subjects I did when I look back 20 years. I mainly did the subjects I did due to parental choice rather than my own as such. I used to be reading the history book cover to cover when I was meant to be doing maths, didn't even do history for the LC.
I had a similar experience. I knew what I wanted to study when I left school and therefore because neither of my parents were experienced with the Irish system, I was guided into studying topics related to that subject, rather than ones in which I could have picked up far more points. Ultimately I failed to get enough to study what I wanted (Thanks Applied Mathematics!) and spent years floating around studying all manner of shite before I got a job. Now what I do has little or nothing to do with what I studied either in highschool or university!

I'm not saying an extra year at the end would have given me the benefit of hindsight but there's far too much pressure with the LC, CAO ect. Our society would be far better served with happy kids, each to their ability ect, than drones being educated to work in industry X and Y.
I think if anything it would give time for the students to find themselves, to use a rather trite phrase, and understand who they are and what direction they want to go and time to consider the choices which will take them there.

, the dual apprentice system that Germany and other countries use would be beneficial to Ireland. Whereas from what I remember, an apprentice was considered not much more than someone who left school early. In DIT where I was the apprentices were basically hidden away from the rest of the students in a grubby old building with caged windows, we used to have a few tutorials in their building so I saw the state of it.
A friend once described how career. guidance went at his school:
  • Very Smart - Apply to Medicine, or subject-specific course at TCD
  • Smart - Apply to subject-specific course at UCD (or if your parents are blowins - UCC/NUIG) or arts at TCD
  • Average - Arts at a nearby University or subject-specific IT course
  • Not so smart - Apprenticeship or skilled manufactiring
  • Dumb - Maybe get yourself a job at Tesco (or Superquinn if you were well spoken)
At my school, if you weren't applying to Medicine, or some sort of accounting/PPE type course, then you brought shame to the school. As mentioned, most of the people I know who did apprenticeships earn more than I do.
 
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