TÚSLA/ Vulnerable children thread.

soccop

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To start a thread in the present day just reading the above report in the Irish Times shows how little resources are put into child services in the Kerry area I’m sure this is replicated across the country .


It is very difficult to feel confident that TÚSLA is fit for purpose, properly resourced or transparent.

Also they hold adoption records and other critical information about young people who availed of the services, anecdotally it seems they are very reluctant to share this information.

Has anyone any experience in this area they are willing to share?

One of my gut feelings is that as it’s impossible to privatise and often tconcerns the less well off and most vulnerable in society successive governments were not too interested in this area.
 

Cruimh

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One of my gut feelings is that as it’s impossible to privatise and often tconcerns the less well off and most vulnerable in society successive governments were not too interested in this area.
And of course for much of the 20th century government - local and central - was wary of stepping on clerical toes.
 

soccop

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And of course for much of the 20th century government - local and central - was wary of stepping on clerical toes.
Well yezs that is a huge factor
The Government abrogated it's responsibility in health , education, childcare, community events and so forth.
Handed these responsibilities over to the religious bodies together with funds and let them run it on a cost effective basis.
Churches are very fond of money
 

Cruimh

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Well yezs that is a huge factor
The Government abrogated it's responsibility in health , education, childcare, community events and so forth.
Handed these responsibilities over to the religious bodies together with funds and let them run it on a cost effective basis.
Churches are very fond of money
There were a number of issues. How deeply should the state be allowed to enter the home was one of the big issues.

In Church & State in Modern Ireland, Second Edition, J H Whyte made some interesting points.

Even clearer evidence that Irish Catholic attitudes to social questions had really changed can be found in the explicit repudiations, by Catholics in the nineteen-sixties, of what had been done by Catholics in the nineteen-forties and fifties. In the Jesuit periodical Studies for winter 1964, an article appeared by the economist Mr Garret FitzGerald (now a Fine Gael front-bencher) which caused considerable interest. Mr FitzGerald’s theme was ‘seeking a national purpose’, and in the course of his argument he remarked: ‘In some respects the thinking of the Catholic Church in Ireland has lagged far behind Catholic thought elsewhere. This has been particularly notable in relation to such matters as social welfare. One cannot resist the conclusion that in the 1930’s and 1940’s the Irish Church took a wrong turning in its thinking on these matters.’18 About the same time a Fine Gael deputy, Mr Declan Costello (son of the Taoiseach of the mother and child scheme era) said in a talk at the Dublin Institute of Catholic Sociology: ‘Social conditions in this country were evidence that Catholic influence on government policies had, on the whole, been preventative rather than positive. There was a danger that Catholic social principles might sometimes be used, unjustifiably, to support an unjust status quo. In the name of Catholic social principles movements towards social reform had been criticised and whilst condemning the reformer, the conditions which he sought to reform are condoned.’19 One can hardly doubt that Mr Costello and in mind the mother and child episode in which his father had played so prominent a part.
Page 334

And while the Politicians became less overt in their bowing to clerical pressure and guidance in the 1950s and 1960s, behind the scenes no sensible government wanted to have a confrontation.
 
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midlander12

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To start a thread in the present day just reading the above report in the Irish Times shows how little resources are put into child services in the Kerry area I’m sure this is replicated across the country .


It is very difficult to feel confident that TÚSLA is fit for purpose, properly resourced or transparent.

Also they hold adoption records and other critical information about young people who availed of the services, anecdotally it seems they are very reluctant to share this information.

Has anyone any experience in this area they are willing to share?

One of my gut feelings is that as it’s impossible to privatise and often tconcerns the less well off and most vulnerable in society successive governments were not too interested in this area.
I've no direct experience of TUSLA but in a previous life I used to deal with the old health boards in relation to fostering and adoption matters (don't want to say anymore about why). While the quality varied from area to area, overall it seemed pretty hopeless - social workers constantly out sick or otherwise absent and constant turnover of staff, no clear care plans for children and as a result a lot of them being moved from one placement to another, and a huge resistance to adoption even when the children's birth parents had made no contact in years. As regards adoption records, again that varied - perhaps a little more open that some of the religious agencies (not hard!) but hamstrung by legislation, the personnel issues mentioned above etc. I emphasise this was 20-25 years ago.

I presume TUSLA was an attempt to standardise all that and take it out of the old health board/HSE framework, but I wonder if it made much difference, or maybe even made things worse.
 

soccop

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I presume TUSLA was an attempt to standardise all that and take it out of the old health board/HSE framework, but I wonder if it made much difference, or maybe even made things worse.







....

From the above article


In late 2019, Tusla discovered issues around social workers under-reporting abuse allegations to gardaí in the area. It later emerged there were 365 cases of suspected child abuse or neglect that had not been referred to gardaí in Kerry. An audit later found the delays notifying gardaí may have thwarted some criminal investigations into alleged abuse.

The Government refuses to resource child care.
 

midlander12

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Dec 4, 2018
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I presume TUSLA was an attempt to standardise all that and take it out of the old health board/HSE framework, but I wonder if it made much difference, or maybe even made things worse.







....

From the above article


In late 2019, Tusla discovered issues around social workers under-reporting abuse allegations to gardaí in the area. It later emerged there were 365 cases of suspected child abuse or neglect that had not been referred to gardaí in Kerry. An audit later found the delays notifying gardaí may have thwarted some criminal investigations into alleged abuse.

The Government refuses to resource child care.
That doesn't surprise me, frankly. I remember coming across a case of a child from an appallingly abusive background who was nonetheless returned to the care of his birth parents. The foster parents were distraught and thanks only to their efforts to locate him, he was subsequently found tied up in a caravan, after which the authorities were finally left with no choice to return him to the foster parents. One fears what would have happened but for their persistence.
 
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