Emerging Virus'es ( Human ) + VARIANTS thread

S

Sky

Guest
A break down by age group of where the infections are at. Well worth reading.

Seems to be another 'expert' with a Twitter account. We've known since Wuhan that children (under 10 in particular) had some kind of natural immunity and that the infection rate in that group was very low, with something approaching a zero fatality rate. Nothing new there.

Given the widely reported (and pretty apparent) poor compliance with distancing and sanitation measures in the 25 to 35 age group, it's not surprising they have the highest infection rates.
 
Nov 27, 2018
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Seems to be another 'expert' with a Twitter account. We've known since Wuhan that children (under 10 in particular) had some kind of natural immunity and that the infection rate in that group was very low, with something approaching a zero fatality rate. Nothing new there.

Given the widely reported (and pretty apparent) poor compliance with distancing and sanitation measures in the 25 to 35 age group, it's not surprising they have the highest infection rates.
Um, we really haven't known since Wuhan that children under ten have some kind of natural immunity, because children under ten DON'T have a natural immunity. They do have a lower infection rate, but infants can contract COVID-19 while in the womb, and young children infected with COVID-19 sometimes develop symptoms very similar to Kawasaki disease.
 
S

Sky

Guest
Um, we really haven't known since Wuhan that children under ten have some kind of natural immunity, because children under ten DON'T have a natural immunity.
The infection rates back in May were something akin to 0.02% in children under 10. Since then there has been a slight increase, but it is still a very small percentage and there aren't figures that indicate whether or not these are related to underlying conditions.


Out of almost 6 million cases recorded by the CDC 7% were in those under 17, there is no breakdown within that as to how many of those were teenagers, but the infection rate in those under 4 is 1.7%. The fatality rate is 0.1%, again no indication as to whether or not there were underlying conditions.

 
Nov 27, 2018
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The infection rates back in May were something akin to 0.02% in children under 10. Since then there has been a slight increase, but it is still a very small percentage and there aren't figures that indicate whether or not these are related to underlying conditions.


Out of almost 6 million cases recorded by the CDC 7% were in those under 17, there is no breakdown within that as to how many of those were teenagers, but the infection rate in those under 4 is 1.7%. The fatality rate is 0.1%, again no indication as to whether or not there were underlying conditions.

So, in other words, children, especially under 10, DON'T have a 'natural immunity' as you claimed. What your post shows is that it seems younger children are less likely to develop the symptoms that adults present. There are, however, confirmed cases of younger children contracting the virus, and, in relatively small amount account of cases, the infection has been fatal.

And this is a very different thing to there being a "natural immunity".
 
S

Sky

Guest
So, in other words, children, especially under 10, DON'T have a 'natural immunity' as you claimed. What your post shows is that it seems younger children are less likely to develop the symptoms that adults present. There are, however, confirmed cases of younger children contracting the virus, and, in relatively small amount account of cases, the infection has been fatal.

And this is a very different thing to there being a "natural immunity".



I'm not making any unfounded claims.
You're just splitting hairs.
 
Nov 27, 2018
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I'm not making any unfounded claims.
You're just splitting hairs.
No, I'm not splitting hairs. I'm pointing that that you said young child have a magical natural immunity. They don't. Saying that they do is inaccurate, irresponsible and quite possibly dangerous.

I'm speaking here as a parent of a young child who is more susceptible to respiratory problems than most (she will require an operation at some point to rectify this, but obviously not in the current shitshow, and it is recommended that such an operation does not take place before she is five years old).
 
S

Sky

Guest
No, I'm not splitting hairs. I'm pointing that that you said young child have a magical natural immunity. They don't. Saying that they do is inaccurate, irresponsible and quite possibly dangerous.

I'm speaking here as a parent of a young child who is more susceptible to respiratory problems than most (she will require an operation at some point to rectify this, but obviously not in the current shitshow, and it is recommended that such an operation does not take place before she is five years old).
That is a gross misrepresentation of what I said, which is well documented and I have indulged you in showing that by posting supporting facts from credible sources.

I'm sorry you're concerned about your child, we all have people and issues we're concerned about.

However, given the sarcastic nature of your original response and your distortions of what I said above, it does appear more like you're fed up and looking to take it out on someone.

I'd rather it wasn't me.

I would refer you to the post at the top of the page.
 
Nov 27, 2018
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That is a gross misrepresentation of what I said, which is well documented and I have indulged you in showing that by posting supporting facts from credible sources.

I'm sorry you're concerned about your child, we all have people and issues we're concerned about.

However, given the sarcastic nature of your original response and your distortions of what I said above, it does appear more like you're fed up and looking to take it out on someone.

I'd rather it wasn't me.

I would refer you to the post at the top of the page.
Ah now. This is exactly what you said:

We've known since Wuhan that children (under 10 in particular) had some kind of natural immunity.
 
Nov 27, 2018
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Yes, "some kind of natural immunity" is not a "magical natural immunity".

I doubt you bothered to read the report from The Lancet which supports what I said. You're behaving like a child. Grow up.
Jesus, you’ve a nasty streak. I’d suggest you have a look at some other of your posts from early pages of this thread. You were very wrong then and yet uou&re still being insulting rather than noticing you’re again digging yourself into a hole.

Some people never bloody learn.
 
S

Sky

Guest
Jesus, you’ve a nasty streak. I’d suggest you have a look at some other of your posts from early pages of this thread. You were very wrong then and yet uou&re still being insulting rather than noticing you’re again digging yourself into a hole.

Some people never bloody learn.
I've a nasty streak because I made a point that I've supported, that you have misrepresented, and I've pointed out that you've misrepresented?

Now you're desperately trying to look for anything you can to justify your behaviour?

It's coming across as bullying and very nasty on your part. Take a look in the mirror when you start make personal attacks on people.
 

Robutnua

Member
Nov 28, 2018
12,353
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1276 cases
8 deaths (5 in October, 2 in September, 1 in June) - RIP

278 in Dublin,
149 in Cork,
108 in Meath,
107 in Galway,
80 in Wexford
the remaining 554 cases are spread across 21 counties

644 are men / 631 are women
69% are under 45 years of age
The median age is 31 years old

In hospital: 260
In ICU: 30
 

Norman Bates

You thought I was nice...
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Dec 10, 2018
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... well, as predicted ... the figures keep increasing. Sad the see the number of deaths going up now, also ... (RIP).


8 deaths (including 3 from before October) and 1,276 new cases confirmed
"There have been eight additional deaths reported by the Department of Health today – 5 of which occurred in October, 2 in September, and 1 in June.
The highest number of cases is in Dublin, where 278 cases have been confirmed. There have been 149 cases reported in Cork, 108 in Meath, 107 in Galway, 80 in Wexford, and 554 cases across the other 21 counties. 69% of the new cases are among people under age 45, and the median age of individuals with a newly reported case of Covid-19 is 31. As of 2pm today, there are 260 Covid-19 patients in hospital, with 30 in ICU."



1,031 new virus cases and two further deaths in Northern Ireland
 

Gatsbygirl20

Member
Dec 2, 2018
8,750
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1276 cases
8 deaths (5 in October, 2 in September, 1 in June) - RIP

278 in Dublin,
149 in Cork,
108 in Meath,
107 in Galway,
80 in Wexford
the remaining 554 cases are spread across 21 counties

644 are men / 631 are women
69% are under 45 years of age
The median age is 31 years old

In hospital: 260
In ICU: 30

ICU stable at 30.

19 admissions to hospitals in last 24 hours

18 discharges from hospital in last 24 hours
 

snorlax

Member
Dec 11, 2019
1,969
1,907
ICU stable at 30.

19 admissions to hospitals in last 24 hours

18 discharges from hospital in last 24 hours
merely a matter of time before it rises, as people who are qualified medical professionals have warned, and the dublin figures have continued to rise over level three. This is a disaster and we need to face that fact.
 

midlander12

Member
Dec 4, 2018
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... well, as predicted ... the figures keep increasing. Sad the see the number of deaths going up now, also ... (RIP).


8 deaths (including 3 from before October) and 1,276 new cases confirmed
"There have been eight additional deaths reported by the Department of Health today – 5 of which occurred in October, 2 in September, and 1 in June.
The highest number of cases is in Dublin, where 278 cases have been confirmed. There have been 149 cases reported in Cork, 108 in Meath, 107 in Galway, 80 in Wexford, and 554 cases across the other 21 counties. 69% of the new cases are among people under age 45, and the median age of individuals with a newly reported case of Covid-19 is 31. As of 2pm today, there are 260 Covid-19 patients in hospital, with 30 in ICU."



1,031 new virus cases and two further deaths in Northern Ireland

I see the IT and Luke O'Neill are talking up the chances of a vaccine and a 'quickie' antigen test which will supposedly restore normality. I suppose it's an upmarket version of the tabloids' 'lockdown to save Christmas' nonsense.

Perhaps it might be a better idea to accept that we are not going to have anything like 'normality' for quite a while, and stop fumbling around for magic solutions or quick fixes, whether they be lockdowns or DIY tests. There are a handful of countries in Europe who are handling this well, and keeping their numbers under control - all a fraction of our cases, despite the recent upsurges. They are Norway, Finland, Latvia, Estonia and to a lesser extent Denmark and Sweden. I'm not sure how they're doing it, but whatever it is, it isn't on-off lockdowns and fantasies about Covid being eliminated in time for Christmas. It might be an idea to start looking at them. This is going to be a long haul, with repeated waves of infection punctuated by quieter periods and localised outbreaks, and it will require stoicism, realism and resilience to deal with them, and not the current pattern of complacency followed by panic, and then rinse and repeat.

 

Norman Bates

You thought I was nice...
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Dec 10, 2018
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Three further deaths, 1,283 new cases

"Of the cases notified today 408 are in Dublin, 156 in Cork, 88 in Kildare, 80 in Meath, 55 in Limerick and the remaining 496 cases are spread across 21 counties. Women account for 651 cases, with 628 cases are men. 68% are under 45 years of age with the median age of 31 years old.
As of 2pm today, 277 Covid-19 patients are hospitalised, of which 33 are in ICU. There have been 17 additional hospitalisations in the past 24 hours."


NI: Five more deaths, 1,012 new coronavirus cases

"In Northern Ireland, a further 1,012 individuals have tested positive for Covid-19 in the past 24 hours and the virus has been linked to the deaths of five more people."

May they rest in peace.
 
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Robutnua

Member
Nov 28, 2018
12,353
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1031 cases, no deaths

235 in Dublin,
232 in Cork,

60 in Galway,
47 in Limerick,

47 in Kerry
the remaining 410 cases are spread across 21 counties

511 are men / 518 are women
70% are under 45 years of age
median age is 30 years old

In hospital: 298
In ICU: 34

The number of COVID cases in Ireland has passed 50,000 since the start of the pandemic


Cork near Dublin FFs and way smaller pop
 
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midlander12

Member
Dec 4, 2018
3,089
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1031 cases, no deaths

235 in Dublin,
232 in Cork,

60 in Galway,
47 in Limerick,

47 in Kerry
the remaining 410 cases are spread across 21 counties

511 are men / 518 are women
70% are under 45 years of age
median age is 30 years old

In hospital: 298
In ICU: 34

The number of COVID cases in Ireland has passed 50,000 since the start of the pandemic


Cork near Dublin FFs and way smaller pop
Yes Cork (city anyway) should have been on Level 4 weeks ago (ironically the three Ulster counties and Meath had relatively modest numbers today). Anyway, all academic now. It seems, unlike other European countries, we are firmly locked into all-out-lockdown narrative where lesser measures are seen as effete and insufficient, and no doubt we will have the same cycle again in March or so, or perhaps earlier if we attempt some ill-judged early December reopening 'to save Christmas'.

 

Bonkers

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Feb 15, 2019
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Yes Cork (city anyway) should have been on Level 4 weeks ago (ironically the three Ulster counties and Meath had relatively modest numbers today). Anyway, all academic now. It seems, unlike other European countries, we are firmly locked into all-out-lockdown narrative where lesser measures are seen as effete and insufficient, and no doubt we will have the same cycle again in March or so, or perhaps earlier if we attempt some ill-judged early December reopening 'to save Christmas'.

Most other European countries have better health systems than us to all our eternal shame. We’ve elected govs that did basically nothing to change that.
 
“There are three different categories of assault: Assault, Assault Causing Harm, and Assault Causing Serious Harm. The use or expected use of force is an important element to all three categories of assault. A definition of force includes any form of energy for example heat, light, electric current or noise or any matter in solid, liquid or gaseous form.”
- Garda website

I’m not an expert. But if you ask me, I’d be a bit hesitant in resorting to emergency powers laws to enforce another lockdown. The justice system already has specific laws as alluded to in the quoted statements. I obviously appreciate the need for hygiene, masks, soap, isolation if after close contact, etc..

I don’t want to sound defeatist. I understood the need for the first lockdown. But now the virus is already in every part of the country. The virus has breached every border. So how effective will it be to confine people to a certain geographical area? People restricted to a city will encounter far more people in a 5km radius than those who live in a small town. So I don’t know if people in other areas pose much more of a statistical threat than the local people already at your location.

I’m certainly not being indifferent to people suffering from this dangerous flu. I’m just saying the health system obviously depends on taxes. Governments unfortunately only have finite resources. How will the deficit from another lockdown affect funding for any future HSE project?

“You can be convicted of the criminal transmission of an STD only if you cause someone else to be infected intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly.”
- criminal defense lawyer website
 

Robutnua

Member
Nov 28, 2018
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5,611
Yes Cork (city anyway) should have been on Level 4 weeks ago (ironically the three Ulster counties and Meath had relatively modest numbers today). Anyway, all academic now. It seems, unlike other European countries, we are firmly locked into all-out-lockdown narrative where lesser measures are seen as effete and insufficient, and no doubt we will have the same cycle again in March or so, or perhaps earlier if we attempt some ill-judged early December reopening 'to save Christmas'.

The main spike in Cork city seems to be CORK SOUTH CENTRAL which is now one of or is the highest per 100,000 in the country. Yjis is basically the city centre, UCC area .. the central core of the city

Rest of Europe starting to follow Belgium lockdown imminent. Wales into two week lockdown shortly. More to come ..
 

midlander12

Member
Dec 4, 2018
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2,108
The main spike in Cork city seems to be CORK SOUTH CENTRAL which is now one of or is the highest per 100,000 in the country. Yjis is basically the city centre, UCC area .. the central core of the city

Rest of Europe starting to follow Belgium lockdown imminent. Wales into two week lockdown shortly. More to come ..
Belgium is an extreme case, and is probably not going into full lockdown anyway. Wales's is allegedly limited to 2 weeks. I can't see general lockdowns across Europe. They seem determined to stick to their undeclared 'herd immunity with masks' shtick, behind the usual pious platitudes. Otherwise action would have been taken well before now.
 

curio

Member
Feb 26, 2019
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“There are three different categories of assault: Assault, Assault Causing Harm, and Assault Causing Serious Harm. The use or expected use of force is an important element to all three categories of assault. A definition of force includes any form of energy for example heat, light, electric current or noise or any matter in solid, liquid or gaseous form.”
- Garda website

I’m not an expert. But if you ask me, I’d be a bit hesitant in resorting to emergency powers laws to enforce another lockdown. The justice system already has specific laws as alluded to in the quoted statements. I obviously appreciate the need for hygiene, masks, soap, isolation if after close contact, etc..

I don’t want to sound defeatist. I understood the need for the first lockdown. But now the virus is already in every part of the country. The virus has breached every border. So how effective will it be to confine people to a certain geographical area? People restricted to a city will encounter far more people in a 5km radius than those who live in a small town. So I don’t know if people in other areas pose much more of a statistical threat than the local people already at your location.

I’m certainly not being indifferent to people suffering from this dangerous flu. I’m just saying the health system obviously depends on taxes. Governments unfortunately only have finite resources. How will the deficit from another lockdown affect funding for any future HSE project?

“You can be convicted of the criminal transmission of an STD only if you cause someone else to be infected intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly.”
- criminal defense lawyer website
People took the piss during the first lockdown and after, justice Woulfe being a good example of self exemption.

Anyone who persisting with thinking it was just a bad flu that would pass have been disabused of that notion in the last month, so consider the last shutdown a rehearsal.
 

ruserious

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Dec 4, 2018
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I think that's a good way of looking at it, if this time there is a level of enforcement.
Problem is, the public no longer hold the same fear factor as we did in March when we saw the coffins line Italian churches, fearing we were next.
 

curio

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Feb 26, 2019
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Problem is, the public no longer hold the same fear factor as we did in March when we saw the coffins line Italian churches, fearing we were next.
I think the fear is replaced with more reality now because more people understand that if granny snuffs it because you partied and brought it home then the family will never forget it.
 
Nov 29, 2018
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Belgium is an extreme case, and is probably not going into full lockdown anyway. Wales's is allegedly limited to 2 weeks. I can't see general lockdowns across Europe. They seem determined to stick to their undeclared 'herd immunity with masks' shtick, behind the usual pious platitudes. Otherwise action would have been taken well before now.
France is taking a regional approach with curfews and bar closures in some cities but not in others. Depends on the numbers.
 

Mitsui2

Member
Nov 30, 2018
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Between Time and Timbuktu
Problem is, the public no longer hold the same fear factor as we did in March when we saw the coffins line Italian churches, fearing we were next.
With all (much) due respect, speak for yourself, ru.

Having thought it through, I've concluded that one way or another, at some stage I'll inevitably contract the virus.

Since four decades of smoking have enormously compromised my lungs [to the extent that I've had bigtime COPD hospitalisation-weird-shit issues sort of stuff for the past couple of years] plus being over 60, I've also concluded - also (I hope) logically - that I'll probably die as a result of contracting the little bugger.

I won't say I'm actually afraid of my logical conclusion, since I've never been hugely attached to life. But I'd have preferred to die of something a bit more...eh... traditional!
 

Bill

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Mar 9, 2019
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Livin' La Veda Lockdown
With all (much) due respect, speak for yourself, ru.

Having thought it through, I've concluded that one way or another, at some stage I'll inevitably contract the virus.

Since four decades of smoking have enormously compromised my lungs [to the extent that I've had bigtime COPD hospitalisation-weird-shit issues sort of stuff for the past couple of years] plus being over 60, I've also concluded - also (I hope) logically - that I'll probably die as a result of contracting the little bugger.

I won't say I'm actually afraid of my logical conclusion, since I've never been hugely attached to life. But I'd have preferred to die of something a bit more...eh... traditional!
If it gets me before I paint the hall stairs and landing, herself will curse my name forever.
 

ruserious

Member
Dec 4, 2018
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With all (much) due respect, speak for yourself, ru.

Having thought it through, I've concluded that one way or another, at some stage I'll inevitably contract the virus.

Since four decades of smoking have enormously compromised my lungs [to the extent that I've had bigtime COPD hospitalisation-weird-shit issues sort of stuff for the past couple of years] plus being over 60, I've also concluded - also (I hope) logically - that I'll probably die as a result of contracting the little bugger.

I won't say I'm actually afraid of my logical conclusion, since I've never been hugely attached to life. But I'd have preferred to die of something a bit more...eh... traditional!
Just wanted to clarify that when I said the “public no longer fear it” I was generalising on society as a whole. Plenty of people, like yourself have every reason to be weary of it. But I guess my point is, the public fear element has shifted.

Hope you stay well cocooned over coming weeks!
 
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