Back in my day... Nostalgia Thread

Mitsui2

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When myself & Mrs M were at the vaccine centre (in a local hotel) there was an abundance of middle-aged men in hi-viz coats directing the cars on where to park in the hotel parking lot. Some of them were wearing nautical-looking peaked caps , and it brought to my mind the fellas that you'd see years ago, trying to look official and directing parking in many on-street parking spots in Dublin city centre in hope of some payment. I don't think I'd actually thought of those guys at all in the twenty years since I moved out of the city. Are they still going anywhere? Surely not - another traditional trade fallen victim to modern times!
 

Cookiemonster

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When myself & Mrs M were at the vaccine centre (in a local hotel) there was an abundance of middle-aged men in hi-viz coats directing the cars on where to park in the hotel parking lot. Some of them were wearing nautical-looking peaked caps , and it brought to my mind the fellas that you'd see years ago, trying to look official and directing parking in many on-street parking spots in Dublin city centre in hope of some payment. I don't think I'd actually thought of those guys at all in the twenty years since I moved out of the city. Are they still going anywhere? Surely not - another traditional trade fallen victim to modern times!
Pretty much anyone, on a voluntary basis or on minimum wage, doing anything while wearing a high-viz vest, carrying a radio and/or a clipboard is an utter bollix.

"Taxi coordinators" are weirdly common here. Some bloke in a high-viz vest standing at the front of the taxi queue on a Friday or Saturday night asking "where are you going to?" followed up with "Right, the next one's yours.". That's it, no communication with anyone else, no prioritization or coordination or obvious function to anyone. You could literally tell him anywhere and he'd respond "Right, the next one's yours.". Who doesn't know how a taxi queue works?! Oh, he's there for security and to make sure nobody skips the queue you might think. No. Saw one run away when a fight broke out in the queue and the drivers themselves got out of their cars to sort it.
 

milipod

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Pretty much anyone, on a voluntary basis or on minimum wage, doing anything while wearing a high-viz vest, carrying a radio and/or a clipboard is an utter bollix.

"Taxi coordinators" are weirdly common here. Some bloke in a high-viz vest standing at the front of the taxi queue on a Friday or Saturday night asking "where are you going to?" followed up with "Right, the next one's yours.". That's it, no communication with anyone else, no prioritization or coordination or obvious function to anyone. You could literally tell him anywhere and he'd respond "Right, the next one's yours.". Who doesn't know how a taxi queue works?! Oh, he's there for security and to make sure nobody skips the queue you might think. No. Saw one run away when a fight broke out in the queue and the drivers themselves got out of their cars to sort it.
What has it got to with him where you are going?
 

soccop

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Gatsbygirl20

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The Lock Hard Men - Parking In Dublin 1991 - RTE
https://www.rte.ie › archives › 758711-the-lock-hard-m...


8 Jan 2016 — Parking attendants have been a feature of city life for years but many Dubliners are wary of the lock hard men.
They were a menace. And only in the 1980s---the decade of low expectations, heroin-infested urban decay, and corruption at every level----would they have been allowed to ply their trade.

In the nod-and -wink culture of the era, they offered to "mind your car" for a fee

But the reality was that if you declined their services, you might return to find your windshield wipers missing on a wet night

Both sides knew that that was the unspoken threat.

But the motorist accepted this extortion.
 

soccop

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It was never mentioned in Career Guidance as a desirable position with a substantial arc, funnily enough. I always thought anyone who did was fairly desperate and I'd give them something. I remember being on the heady sum of 499 a week before tax.
 

Gatsbygirl20

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It was never mentioned in Career Guidance as a desirable position with a substantial arc, funnily enough. I always thought anyone who did was fairly desperate and I'd give them something. I remember being on the heady sum of 499 a week before tax.
I was quite scared of them. I remember one winter's night I was on my own, because I was meeting friends in the Gate. I parked up near Parnell square. It was made very clear to me by one of these menacing characters that I had better pay up or else.

I already had cars stolen and burned out in the rather dodgy area where I lived, and I was very wary and paranoid about my car

Living in the inner city in Dublin in the 1980s was not for the faint hearted.
 
Nov 29, 2018
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The Lock Hard Men - Parking In Dublin 1991 - RTE
https://www.rte.ie › archives › 758711-the-lock-hard-m...


8 Jan 2016 — Parking attendants have been a feature of city life for years but many Dubliners are wary of the lock hard men.
Do you remember the guy who used to wash the parking meters? I never did figure out if he was employed by the corpo or just did it as a hobby. He wore a tricolour peaked cap and doubled up as a lockhard man. Worked around the Green, Cuffe Street, Anne Street area.
 
Nov 29, 2018
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They were a menace. And only in the 1980s---the decade of low expectations, heroin-infested urban decay, and corruption at every level----would they have been allowed to ply their trade.

In the nod-and -wink culture of the era, they offered to "mind your car" for a fee

But the reality was that if you declined their services, you might return to find your windshield wipers missing on a wet night

Both sides knew that that was the unspoken threat.

But the motorist accepted this extortion.
I thought they were great, very much Dublin characters and completely harmless. I can park between two cars with less than an inch to spare, front and back, thanks to the lockhard men.
 
Nov 29, 2018
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I was quite scared of them. I remember one winter's night I was on my own, because I was meeting friends in the Gate. I parked up near Parnell square. It was made very clear to me by one of these menacing characters that I had better pay up or else.

I already had cars stolen and burned out in the rather dodgy area where I lived, and I was very wary and paranoid about my car

Living in the inner city in Dublin in the 1980s was not for the faint hearted.
I never found them menacing, used to chat to them and give them a few Bob. Parked cars in some of the roughest areas of the city, often left them overnight, never had a car robbed or broken into. When you consider that I was often driving hired cars, that is an achievement. Bit of empathy takes you a long way.
 

Norman Bates

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Do you remember the guy who used to wash the parking meters? I never did figure out if he was employed by the corpo or just did it as a hobby. He wore a tricolour peaked cap and doubled up as a lockhard man. Worked around the Green, Cuffe Street, Anne Street area.
No, can't say I do remember him.
 

Gatsbygirl20

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I never found them menacing, used to chat to them and give them a few Bob. Parked cars in some of the roughest areas of the city, often left them overnight, never had a car robbed or broken into. When you consider that I was often driving hired cars, that is an achievement. Bit of empathy takes you a long way.
I lived in the inner city for four years

I had two cars stolen and burned out. They were parked on the road outside my house

My neighbour parked his car in his brother's garage overnight, and walked to collect it in the morning.

I have no nostalgia for that era

If I ever found the scumbags who burned the cars I worked and saved to buy, empathy is not what they'd get from me.
 
Nov 29, 2018
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I lived in the inner city for four years

I had two cars stolen and burned out. They were parked on the road outside my house

My neighbour parked his car in his brother's garage overnight, and walked to collect it in the morning.

I have no nostalgia for that era

If I ever found the scumbags who burned the cars I worked and saved to buy, empathy is not what they'd get from me.
Back in those days, it was "town", not "inner city" to the natives. The really tough areas wete known by name, north and south side. When I bought in Portobello it was rough but never had a problem. Same around York Street and the roughest parts of SCR, parked cars and often left them for days while I went on the razz. Always in one piece when I came back. As I was working abroad my car could be parked in Portobello for months at a time.

Never had a problem, anywhere in Dublin, even at the height of the heroin scourge and in the toughest parts of Dublin. As I said building relationships and empathy went, and goes, a long way.
 
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